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Rigging a Flying Scot

Step 8 - Trailer & Launching

Now your Flying Scot is rigged and sitting on her trailer. The next step is to launch and go sailing!

IMPORTANT: Before you do anything, look around to see that you do not have tree limbs or power lines in the way of the mast.

Many ramps have power lines and lights so fishermen can launch before dawn. Wires can be very hard to see and are the most common cause of mast or rigging breakage and are the most serious hazard to your life. Look up and check that your launch path is clear. While it is not as critical as watching for power lines, it is comforting just the same to put in the drain plug before launching. This little caution will keep the boat dry while sailing.


 

Put in the drain plug before launching.
It is best to flip the lever up as show so that it
does not snag a line and come out inadvertently.

 

 

You should also have a line attached to your boat before you launch her. Many sailors have launched, watched the boat roll off the trailer only to find she had no bow line and was drifting away. The line should be long enough to let the boat roll off the trailer, and to guide her to a nearby dock, or bring her back to shore.


 

Back the trailer into the water so that no more than one-half of the license plate is submerged. Having the trailer in too deep will allow the stern of the boat to float too soon and may cause the boat to go off of the trailer at an angle that could damage the boat.

 

 

Be sure that when launching and hauling the boat, it remains in touch with the rear roller (the rear load-bearing roller that is generally the second one forward from the back end of the trailer). This is best accomplished by backing the trailer into the water so that no more than one-half of the license plate is submerged. Having the trailer in too deep will allow the stern of the boat to float too soon and may cause the boat to go off of the trailer at an angle that could damage the boat.

Be sure the emergency brake is set, the bow line is attached to the bow eye and the drain plug is in. If the rudder is installed, be sure to lift the blade to the full-up position and secure the tiller at center to help the boat roll in straight. Disconnect the trailer winch line from the bow and give the boat a good hard shove to get her started moving. The boat should roll straight back until it is in the water and free of the trailer. Once floating, secure her to the dock, and remove your car and trailer from the ramp, so others can launch.


 

Disconnect the trailer winch line from the bow and give the boat a good hard shove to get her started moving. The boat should roll straight back until it is in the water and free of the trailer.

 

 

When hauling the boat out of the water, make sure your winch line is securely fastened to your bow eye and the boat is lined up with the center of the trailer. When cranking the winch, stand out of the way of the handle, and out of the way of the line. You do not want to get hit by a broken strap. This strap should be constructed of a low-stretch material so that if the strap fails, it will not snap back with a lot of stored energy that could cause damage or injury.

IMPORTANT: Keep your hands and fingers out of the winch and clear of a free spinning winch handle!

To haul the boat out, back the trailer into the water so that the license plate is two-thirds to fully submerged and bring the boat to the back end of the trailer. You should walk out on the trailer catwalk with winch line in hand. Hook the line into the bow eye and center the boat on the loading guide roller. Walk back to the trailer winch keeping tension on the line at all times so that the boat stays centered on the roller. If there is a crosswind, a second person in the boat might paddle to keep the boat lined up with the trailer. If the wind is strong, this person can hold the boat straight with a long line from shore to the spinnaker fairlead. The loading guide roller may come in contact with the bow a few inches above the waterline, but the boat will climb up onto the roller when you begin pulling with the winch. Crank away smartly with the trailer winch and the boat should climb on the trailer with ease.


 

To haul the boat out, back the trailer into the water so that the license plate is two-thirds to fully submerged and bring the boat to the back end of the trailer. You should walk out on the trailer catwalk with winch line in hand. Hook the line into the bow eye and center the boat on the loading guide roller.

 

 

IMPORTANT: Hauling and launching will require only half the effort if you keep the bearings of the rollers and the winch well lubricated with frequent applications of oil.

In order to keep your trailer working well, you should periodically oil the rollers, winch and coupler. Your lights will be virtually trouble-free if you disassemble each light and coat all of the metal parts with Vaseline to prevent corrosion. It also helps to coat the wiring plug as well. Your tires should be inflated to fifty pounds with seventy to eighty foot-pounds of torque on the lug nuts/bolts. You should frequently inspect the trailer for loose fasteners and cracked or worn parts


HOIST AND SAIL RIG

Next step: you are ready to finish rigging the boat and hoist the sails.

Now that you have your Flying Scot in the water, tie her to the downwind side of the dock with the bow line and let the stern free so that the boat will always be pointed into the wind. Now it's time to bring aboard your gear. Stow the anchor in the anchor holder if the boat is so equipped with the line attached. The paddle can be stored in the paddle holder under the port foredeck if the boat is so equipped. Otherwise, it can be stored on the floor under the starboard foredeck. If you are using the spinnaker, stow the spinnaker pole on the forward starboard side as well. Life jackets and such should be stowed under the aft deck.

Dump the mainsail from its bag, gather the foot of the sail and put it on the foredeck.

Always rig the Flying Scot from the starboard side.


 

Start by opening the tack pin in the gooseneck fitting and inserting the clew of the mainsail into the boom sail track with the bolt rope running between the horns of the tack fitting.

 


Start by opening the tack pin in the gooseneck fitting and inserting the clew of the mainsail into the boom sail track with the bolt rope running between the horns of the tack fitting. Walk the sail aft while guiding the bolt rope into the sail track then be sure to secure the tack pin through the sail's tack grommet. If the outhaul line is not on the boom already, lead one end from back to front through the aluminum cleat mounted midway back on the underside of the boom. The line then is led forward through the turning block on the port side of the boom from bottom to top. The outhaul line then travels aft through the turning block shackled to the end boom casting from port to starboard. Lead the line forward through the clew grommet in the mainsail from port to starboard.


 

The aft part of the outhaul is rigged by bringing the line aft through the turning block shackled to the end boom casting from port to starboard. Lead the line forward through the clew grommet in the mainsail from port to starboard. Finally, the outhaul line travels aft again and is dead-ended through the open hole in the boom end casting with a figure eight knot.

 

 

Finally, the outhaul line travels aft again and is dead-ended through the open hole in the boom end casting with a figure eight knot. Tension the outhaul line so that the wrinkles are pulled out of the foot of the mainsail and cleat the line. You can keep the tail of the line out of the cockpit by tying it off with a slip knot to the long part of the outhaul line between the turning block forward and the turning block at the end boom casting

When you de-rig the boat, you can leave the outhaul line rigged by undoing the figure eight knot, pulling the line clear of the sail and then putting it back through the hole in the end boom casting and securing it with a figure eight knot.


 

Shackle the main halyard to the headboard and insert the luff bolt rope into the sail track on the mast. Use the halyard winch to hoist the sail enough to take out all slack in the main halyard and start the sail up the mast.

 

 

Shackle the main halyard to the headboard and insert the luff bolt rope into the sail track on the mast. Use the halyard winch to hoist the sail enough to take out all slack in the main halyard and start the sail up the mast. Be sure to keep the top batten pocket within your reach. Lock the halyard winch and insert the short battens into the top and bottom batten pockets. Install the two long battens into the middle pockets.


 

Insert the short battens into the top and bottom batten pockets.
Install the two long battens into the middle pockets.

 

 

 

Attach the jib, starting at the bottom with the tack shackle and work up by snapping the jib to the forestay and attaching the jib halyard shackle to the head. The jib sheet should be attached to the jib by tying a bowline with a small loop to the clew with the two legs of the bowline being equal length.


 

Attach the jib, starting at the bottom with the tack shackle and work up by snapping the jib to the forestay and attaching the jib halyard shackle to the head.

 

 

Run the ends of the jib sheet inside the shrouds, through the jib fairlead blocks and then through the ratchet blocks from the outside in on each side. Be sure to tie a figure eight knot near each end to prevent the sheet from being pulled back through the blocks.


 

The jib sheet should be attached to the jib by tying a bowline with a small loop to the clew with the two legs of the bowline being equal length. Run the ends of the jib sheet inside the shrouds, through the jib fairlead blocks and then through the ratchet blocks from the outside in on each side.

 

 

When everything has been rigged and you are ready to get underway, hoist the mainsail using the lower halyard winch spool in the halyard winch. Remember to insert the winch crank from the starboard side and turn the halyard winch clockwise to hoist the sail. Continue until the wrinkles in the luff are pulled out and the headboard is about 2 - 3 inches from the masthead sheave at the top of the mast. Set the pawl in the lower halyard winch spool to lock the halyard winch. The boom will have been lifted clear of the boom crutch. Remove the boom crutch and store it under the aft deck. Install the tiller if it has not yet been done and check the mainsheet to be sure it does not have any unexpected tangles or knots.


DO NOT hoist the mainsail as hard and high as it will go! There must be space between the headboard and sheave or you will break the halyard. Remember, only hoist the headboard 2 - 3 inches from the masthead sheave.

 

 

IMPORTANT: DO NOT hoist the mainsail as hard and high as it will go! There must be space between the headboard and sheave or you will break the halyard. Remember, only hoist the headboard 2 - 3 inches from the masthead sheave.


Hoist the jib using the upper halyard winch spool in the halyard winch. Remember to insert the winch crank from the starboard side and turn the halyard winch clockwise to hoist the sail. It is best to hold tension on the jib halyard while hoisting by pinching the halyard wire between your thumb and forefinger where it exits the sail track on the starboard side just above the boom.

 

 

Hoist the jib using the upper halyard winch spool in the halyard winch. Remember to insert the winch crank from the starboard side and turn the halyard winch clockwise to hoist the sail. It is best to hold tension on the jib halyard while hoisting by pinching the halyard wire between your thumb and forefinger where it exits the sail track on the starboard side just above the boom. Wind the halyard holding this tension until the sail is nearly all the way up and you are ready to tension the halyard. (NOTE - Winding the halyard wire on the halyard winch with tension will make lowering the jib easier and it will also extend the life of the wire.) Finish hoisting the jib by tensioning the halyard with enough force to lift the toggle plate (located under the foredeck at the bow) to a position that is approximately level. (See Figure 3D)

It's now time to lower the centerboard and rudder blade, and cast off. Happy sailing! . .



Despite instructions to new owners and periodic warnings to all owners we continue to replace main halyards which have broken in use.

Breakage is not the fault of the halyard. Properly used, the 1/16-inch stainless cable, with its great factor of safety for stretch, should last the life of the boat. Breakage is the result of improper hoisting of the mainsail, not of insufficient strength. It is possible that a heavier and stiffer cable (although stronger) might break sooner.

What causes the mainsail halyard breaking?

When the mainsail is fully hoisted the halyard shackle should be a good two inches below the mainsail halyard sheave. (See Figure 8K) The reason is that from tack to tack the headboard of the sail must describe an arc of 180 degrees or more. As the halyard shackle moves through this arc, there must be a few inches of wire above the shackle to prevent this movement from fatiguing the wire.

Some classes use painted bands on the mast to mark where the sail should not be raised beyond. The Flying Scot's limit is the mast itself, and this means that each skipper must understand what he is doing and must use discretion. Some overhoist from ignorance, with the mistaken idea that the halyard should be as tight as possible at all times. Some think they are gaining in sail area by hoisting the sail higher. The problem has been accentuated by the recent advent of the cunningham. Formerly, the luff was cut short enough to allow for stretching in heavy weather. Now, some sailmakers make the sail full size, to be hoisted all the way with no tension. Then the tension is to be applied by the down-pull use of the cunningham control. It's easy to see that if a sail is cranked up under heavy tension, there is the probability that the halyard and sheave will suffer.

IMPORTANT: When the mainsail is fully hoisted the halyard shackle should be two inches below the mainsail halyard sheave!



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Jump to:

1. Preparation
2. Raising the Mast
3. Halyard Winches & Forestay Tension
4. Boom
5. Boom Vang
6. Rudder
7. Mainsheet
8. Trailering & Launching
9. Centerboard


 

 

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