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Rigging a Flying Scot

Step 2 - Raising the Mast

There are a number of methods used in raising the Flying Scot mast. Some owners apparently like to make it a community project with as many as six persons all pulling in different directions. Some seem to have a masochistic compulsion to make the job as difficult as possible. We, who have done it, and seen it done, thousands of times, can only recommend what we have found to be the simplest, safest and easiest method. Our method is best done with the assistance of a helper, but the mast can be, and often is raised by one person alone.

We have double-handed and single-handed directions.

DOUBLE-HANDED

Slide or lift the mast aft until you can insert the mast hinge pin into the sail track. Slide the mast forward until the mast hinge pin reaches the stop in the sail track. Free the jib halyard, extend it fully for use in raising the mast.



Insert the mast hinge pin into the sail track.

 


One person should stand on the ground and get ready to attach the jib halyard to the bow eye. If this person would like to help lift the mast, the simplest method is for he or she to attach a line to the forestay and lead it through the bow eye. When they pull on this line to help raise the mast, they are pulling on the centerline. For more leverage, it is also common practice to attach the trailer winch to the forestay with a small piece of line. The person on the ground can then do most of the lifting with the winch once the mast is lifted a few feet off of the horizontal. 

CAUTION: Be sure to use an extra piece of line to secure the boat to the trailer before unhooking the winch from the boat.

It is important to pull from a point on the centerline. Pulling on the jib halyard from a side position on the ground will cause too much side pull and should be avoided. You may need to experiment to see what works best for you.

CAUTION: Be sure not to wrap the wire around the hand. This could cause a serious injury if the mast slips.

The other person should be the tallest and strongest of the two. Make sure the shrouds and forestay are untangled, on deck and unable to catch on anything. He or she should stand on the floor of the cockpit, take the mast with both hands and lift it above his or her shoulders. Step under the mast and push it up, walking it up in one motion while straddling the centerboard trunk. The mast hinge pin will guide the butt of the mast onto the step as long as you prevent the mast from rotating side to side. Push forward on the mast against the shrouds. If you push smartly and keep it moving, you will find this not at all tough to do.


Helper should be on the ground pulling from a point on the centerline. Lifter should be the tallest and strongest of the two. Walk it up from the floor. Push smartly and keep it moving.

 

When the mast is up, the forward person should secure the jib halyard shackle to the bow eye while the aft person pushes forward on the mast. Tighten the jib halyard as explained in the next step (3) and the mast is now secure being held by the two shrouds and the jib halyard.



When the mast is up, secure the jib
halyard shackle to the bow eye.

 

 


SINGLEHANDED

Slide or lift the mast aft until you can insert the mast hinge pin into the sail track. Slide the mast forward until the mast hinge pin reaches the stop in the sail track. Free the jib halyard, pull enough halyard from the halyard winch spool to allow the jib halyard shackle to be even with the bottom of the mast and then lock off the jib halyard. (See next Step (3) for an explanation on the use of the halyard winch.) Lead a low stretch line (the tail end of the centerboard line works well) forward through the bow eye tying one end to the jib halyard shackle. The line must be long enough so that the free end hangs into the cockpit. From the floor of the boat, walk the mast up as described above in the double-handed section.





Lead a low stretch line (the tail end of the centerboard line works well) forward through the bow eye tying one end to the jib halyard shackle.

 

 

Hold the mast steady with one hand. With your free hand, pull the slack out of the line that is tied to the jib halyard. Secure the line below deck to the wooden cleat on the side of the stanchion.



After the mast is up, hold the mast steady with one hand. With your free hand, pull the slack out of the line that is tied to the jib halyard. Secure the line below deck to the wooden cleat on the side of the stanchion.

 

 


Tighten the jib halyard as explained in the next step (3) and the mast is now secure being held by the two shrouds and the jib halyard.




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Jump to:

1. Preparation
2. Raising the Mast
3. Halyard Winches & Forestay Tension
4. Boom
5. Boom Vang
6. Rudder
7. Mainsheet
8. Trailering & Launching
9. Centerboard




 

 

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